Summer Movies and Some You May have Missed

The summer of 2017 was a stretch full of interesting films; some were flops while others turned out to be quite fantastic. Long running series such as “Transformers,” “Pirates of the Caribbean,” and “Alien” added new installments to their franchises. Most did as well as you would expect them to—okay but not amazing. These were additions no one asked for, but Hollywood assumed we wanted. And of course, despite not being incredible, they made enough money to warrant more continuations, spinoffs and prequels than the public knew they needed. There was also the ever-inescapable flush of superhero films, which everyone knows will not be ending any time soon. “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” kicked the summer off strong, clearing a path for DC’s “Wonder Woman.” This film broke box office records and was even praised by Marvel’s official Deadpool twitter for surpassing their film in box office revenue, stating “The Merc may be filthier, but her B.O. is stronger. Congrats #WonderWoman.” Though soon after, Marvel quickly recovered with “Spiderman Homecoming,” bringing about the light-hearted familiarity and reclaiming Spiderman from Sony as their own.

Of course, this summer also had some cinema catastrophes too. With the setback of Sony’s Popeye film, they mistakenly released the biggest slap in the face to our film-going standards. I won’t discuss the “Emoji Movie” long, but with a score of 2/10 from IMDB, everyone should be aware it isn’t just a harmless, movie made for kids But that should be quite obvious from a single, unfortunate viewing.

With a slew of good and bad films flooding the market this summer, epics like “Dunkirk” and another “Planet of the Apes” movie couldn’t save these box office numbers. According to Forbes media and entertainment writer Scott Mendelson, “The bad news is that the summer box office, specifically the domestic summer box office, ended up with around $3.606 billion from May to August, which was the lowest domestic gross since 2006. And in terms of tickets sold (around 405 million tickets), it was the lowest attendance since the summer of 1992.” With this in mind, it’s possible that a few films may have slipped under the radar, but are still worth a viewing.

“Baby Driver” is a film I have to recommend. With a IMDb score of 8.1/10, this movie will at least entertain. The movie revolves around Baby (Ansel Elgort), a very talented getaway driver who uses his own personal soundtrack to help him during heists. However, when he wishes to leave his high-impact life for the girl of his dreams (Lily James), he is coerced into one more heist, which he believes is doomed to fail. With a flowing soundtrack and excellent acting, this movie is made to keep you in your seat along with Baby the entire time.

Lastly is “Logan Lucky.” With a score of 92% on Rotten Tomatoes, the audience score for this movie was high, and it is well deserved. This is a film about family and stealing from NASCAR. Jimmy Logan (Channing Tatum) teams up with his brother Clyde (Adam Driver) and sister Millie (Riley Keough) to steal money from the Charlotte Motor Speedway during the Coca-Cola 600. During this they recruit Joe Bang, which features a breakout performance by Daniel Craig, as he shows us he is no longer just James Bond, but can take on a southern role.

Overall, the summer of 2017 had a number of notable films, even if audiences failed to attend them in their usual masses.

Written by Breanna Brink, Staff Writer

 

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