Fans celebrate Dr. Seuss’ 114th birthday

Bethany Montgomery, managing editor

 

Author of beloved literary favorites including, “Horton Hears a Who” and “Green Eggs and Ham,” Theodor Seuss Geisel had what would have been his 114th birthday on March 2. In 1937, under his famous pseudonym, Dr. Seuss, already a popular cartoonist, submitted his first children’s book for publishing: “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.” Although it was rejected over 25 times before being published, his determination led him to write over 60 books, like some of the most well-known children’s classics of all time, such as “Green Eggs and Ham” and “The Cat in the Hat.”

Dr. Seuss’s distinct rhyming patterns, creative use of simple words mixed with his own nonsensical words, and whimsical illustrations lent not only to the creativity and humor in his works, but also his boundless childlike imagination. Kaili Lebanon shared her own experience with the works of Dr. Seuss: “I can admit that I grew up on Dr. Seuss books and films. He wrote several books that I remember reading over and over again. In fact, I think his books helped me begin to read as a child. I will forever cherish his stories and his amazing capability to rhyme,” she described.

Saint Martin’s celebrated the birthday of Dr. Seuss by paying tribute to the author with specials at the Monk’s Bean and the Cafe. For breakfast, students could choose a Dr. Seuss classic—green eggs and ham, while later in the day serving “roast beast,” a veggie pizza entitled “Oh, the Veggies you’ll eat,” and creative cupcakes inspired by “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish Blue Fish.” The Monk’s Bean offered a one-day-only “truffula tree” Italian soda, made with monin mango, strawberry, and marionberry syrup. Dr. Seuss did not only inspire the menu at Saint Martin’s, but children’s authors and book readers from all walks of life, both here at Saint Martin’s and all across the world.

 

Tell us what you think

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Basic HTML is allowed. Your email address will not be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS

%d bloggers like this: