Described by Swift as a “love letter to love”: Lover – An album review 

Prachi Gohil, Editor without Section 

 

“Experience does make one wise” is an honest statement after listening to the seventh album by Taylor Swift “Lover.” The album, which was released on Aug. 23, 2019, is nothing but dreamy. Swift, who had been away from new music collaborations for nearly three years, did not seem to disappoint as each track is part of a story that is uncovered throughout the entire album.  As summer ends and most of us are busy with our routines, it is always pleasing to retreat back to our comfort zones. With that being said, if you have been a fan and witnessed Swift’s transition from 2006 to 2019, and were a tad bit disappointed with her music. “Lover” proves to be an ode to all the past year experiences, happiness, love, fear, and resentment. 

“Lover” reflects emotional honesty and delivers engaging stories to make one believe that “this could be it.” The album includes many settings and talks about different people and their importance in her life. It is also a gift from Swift as she is known to collect memories, line them up with metaphors and ephemeral details, and present it to her audience as a gift wrapped with ribbons and sparkles. 

“Lover” is not an attempt to undo any of her past actions. Instead, it nods to her previous album“Reputation,” from 2017. When “Reputation” was released, everyone could agree that Swift was thrown into a black hole of shade, full of despise, and left no room for love or adjustment. But now, “Lover” acknowledges all the rough pathways and bids farewell to the dark side with confetti and Christmas lights. 

The opening song “I forgot you existed” is a hip-hop rhyme which draws reference from “Better than revenge,” and circles over an old feud which no longer matters. “Cruel with the summer” speaks volumes about bad decisions that take place over the course of summer, which ultimately develops into more than a seasonal feel. 

“Devils roll the dice, angels roll their eyes. What doesn’t kill me makes me want you more.”  “I don’t wanna keep secrets just to keep you.”

Moving onto the third track, “Lover” also reflects the theme of the album, which showcases love in depths and zeniths. As an audience, we know there is no going back as we are assured that this is it.  

“Ladies and gentlemen, will you please stand? 

With every guitar string scar on my hand. I take this magnetic force of a man to be my lover.

 My heart’s been borrowed and yours has been blue. All’s well that ends well to end up with you. Swear to be overdramatic and true to my lover”

The song is catchy and makes one swoon over their feet, be it in love or not. “Miss Americana & The Heartbreak Prince” is a metaphor addressed to be sung in a protest. The cheerleaders with the marching band percussion in the background singing  “O- kay” over the lyrics leaves a thrilling and exuberant vibe.

“It’s you and me, there’s nothing like this.

 Miss Americana and The Heartbreak Prince. 

We’re so sad, we paint the town blue. 

Voted most likely to run away with you.

“Cornelia Street” is a throwback to memory and nostalgia, which has the power to bring anything back to life. 

Songs like “ME!”, “Paper Rings” and “You Need To Calm Down” are a collision of popular musical beats to catchy lyrics that leave the listener wanting the songs to never end. 

 “Lover” is an album of love parceled and laced with bitter-sweet past experiences. It was produced by Jack Antonoff,​  ​Joel Little, Louis Bell, and Frank Dukes​, and it brings out the best of Taylor Swift until now.  

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