Black Friday 2017

Julia Lucas, Staff Writer

 

Nov. 23 was marked on everyone’s calendars for months, not only for Thanksgiving, but also for something much bigger than turkey, the start of Black Friday. Three out of every four people this year went shopping over Thanksgiving weekend, both online and in stores. Online shopping increased by almost 18 percent from 2016, with 7.9 billion dollars being spent across the country in online sales. Of those consumers shopping online, a staggering 41 percent used their phones to make their purchases. This could have been a major contributing factor for the lack of lines Saint Martin’s students experienced when they went Black Friday shopping.

Taylor Wolf, a senior, shared that she shopped at Ulta, Target, and Old Navy, and felt that her experiences were hectic, but manageable. Wolf joined the festivities in Utah after spending quality time with her family. She said that she used to work the Black Friday rush when she lived in Oregon and has seen Black Friday get so bad that she could barely move without running into another person. This year she said Black Friday was, in her own words,

“un-black-Friday-y.”

Similar to Wolf, freshmen Emery Norwood, Kamyrn Tiumalu, and Devyn Connolly experienced uncharacteristically short lines when they went shopping. They went to stores such as Victoria’s

Secret, Hollister, Pandora, and Forever 21 that did not have long lines or many people.

One store that many people agreed was the opposite of everywhere else was Old Navy. Old Navy had a staggering 50 percent off the entire store, so people were flooding in trying to get all of the best prices. Emery described scenes in Old Navy as “insane” and remembered the lines going all the way from the front of the store to the kid’s section, which was all the way in the back. Tiumalu and Connolly drove under twenty minutes from campus to find their great deals when they went to the Olympia mall. They said that the only place that really had long lines was Hollister because like Old Navy, they were having 50 percent of the entire store.

Unfortunately for freshman Adrian Madrigal, he did not have the same luck that everyone else seemed to have. He went shopping in California, his home state, and went to the Great Mall of the Bay Area. As a California native myself, I can say from first-hand experience that this mall is always crowded and hectic on normal shopping days. Madrigal spoke of the nightmares of horrible lines that took forever and annoying people everywhere. He was only able to shop at a few stores before he could not handle the pushing and shoving anymore.

From personal experience, I had a similar incident to Madrigal even though I did not go to the same place. My mom and I only went to the Nike store, but we waited in line for an hour and a

half. The line wrapped around the entire store and it was difficult to move. There were not enough cash registers open and the employees were taking absorbent amounts of time checking people out. This was surprising because typically stores are over staffed around the holidays, so situations like this do not happen often. For example, even though Emery spoke of the long lines at Old Navy, she said that she only waited for fifteen minutes before she checked out and was out the door. Emery said the Old Navy staff was more than prepared for the rush and greatly succeeded on Black Friday. Maybe Nike should take a few tips from Old Navy for next year’s Black Friday. Overall many Saint Martin’s students were able to experience Black Friday in stores over the break and pick up a few great deals, which made all the chaos worth it in the end.  

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